Monthly roundup

Monthly roundup: July 2020

Hello, hello, and welcome to Pandemic Month 478274983249372, or so it feels! I’ve been fairly terrible about blogging this month, and I apologize. My brain is just exhausted and it’s been difficult trying to cram in everything I need to get done every day, so some things are falling by the wayside- seriously, you should see my laundry pile. YIKES.

We’re still hanging in there at the Only-Very-Occasionally-At-The-Library Household (I’ve made, I think, three trips to the library this month? It’s been awesome). We had a socially distanced picnic with my mother-in-law, sister-in-law, and nephew; we let the kids run around but only when they were wearing masks (which they do with no complaints, unlike so many of the adults I see on FB, seriously, wtf guys, my daughter was running far enough and long enough to get sweaty while wearing a mask, I think you can handle it for a ten minute errand to pick up Old Spice deodorant at Walmart…), and that was pretty much our highlight of the month!

Let’s recap this month, shall we?

What I Read in July of 2020

  1. The Things a Brother Knows by Dana Reinhardt

2. How We Fight For Our Lives by Saeed Jones

3. Billion Dollar Cowboy by Carolyn Brown

4. Till the Stars Fall by Kathleen Gilles Seidel

5. Confessions of a Closet Catholic by Sarah Darer Littman

6. The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis (no review; read out loud to my daughter)

7. I Want You to Know We’re Still Here: A Post-Holocaust Memoir by Esther Safran Foer

8. Hostage by Guy Delisle

9. Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler’s War and Stalin’s Peace by Masha Gessen

10. Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares by Aarti Namdev Shahani

11. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Juster (no review; read out loud to my daughter)

12. Roomies by Christina Lauren

13. Twice in a Blue Moon by Christina Lauren

14. Closer by Alexa Riley (no review; listened to the audiobook as I exercised. More on this below)

Many of the books I didn’t review fully were included in my mini-review post here. Somehow, when I was writing that post, Ester and Ruzya got left off, so let’s include that right now. Masha Gessen writes the story of her grandmothers surviving World War II and Stalin’s regime in Poland and Russia. It’s a bleak story starring two strong, determined women. I have a few other books by Ms. Gessen on my TBR and I’m looking forward to seeing how her storytelling style translates when it comes to less personal stories. Great book; difficult to read at times (more because of my mental exhaustion than anything).

Not a bad month for reading, all around. I’m finding I have a tougher time focusing on nonfiction right now; I’ve got what I’ve been referring to as ‘pandemic brain,’ where I’m just exhausted and can’t take in information quite as well. I’ve got an information-dense book going on right now that I began in the middle of the month, but I’ve had to cut it down to reading 25 pages a day and reading something lighter at night because I’m just too worn out. Such are these strange times, I guess.

The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis REALLY irritated me. The ending was just… Have you read it? My husband was in the room as I read the last few pages aloud and even he was like, “WTF…” I don’t know how much of it my daughter really got, but we were super weirded out, and now we’re always joking about Susan, that nylon-wearing tart. SUCH a strange way to end a series, and my daughter and I are so glad to be done with it.

Five books marked off my reading challenge! Speaking of which…

Reading Challenge Updates

I’m close to being done! Check out these bad boys:

I’m currently reading a book recommended by Smart Podcast, Trashy Books, the podcast from Smart Bitches, Trashy Books (plus I have another one on hold at the library!), so that’ll be checked off soon. I have a book by a journalist on hold as well; if it doesn’t come in after next month, I’ll maybe try to search for another one. And obviously I’m waiting to read a banned book, because Banned Books Week doesn’t come around until September. So, basically, lots of waiting going on around here. I’m glad to be mostly done with this, though I do miss the direction the 2020 PopSugar Reading Challenge gave me! 🙂

I’m holding off on the other challenges I was planning on participating in; my brain needs the break.

State of the Goodreads TBR

OY. 149 last month, 152 this month. Not a huge leap, but that’s because I knocked a few off of there this month, including Here We Are, Ester and Ruzya, How We Fight For Our Lives, and The Things a Brother Knows. I’m working on more, but I’ve strayed a few times because a lot of what’s on my TBR is heavier nonfiction and I simply cannot right this moment. Light and fluffy is winning.

Books I Acquired in July 2020

None!

Bookish Things I Did in July 2020

I’ve made three (I think) library appointments so far. It’s been awesome having new books around for my daughter. We’re doing about 3 hours of school per day, and a huge chunk of that is us reading together or me reading to her. We finished up the Molly series of American Girl books and have moved on to Kit; Molly’s sacrifices as a child growing up during World War II, and Kit’s struggles during the Great Depression have helped my daughter understand about sacrifice and working together for the common good. They’re excellent examples of why we stay at home, and why we wear masks in the rare instances when we have to be out in public. Reading these stories really illustrates these concepts for my daughter, and I’m really enjoying reading them with her.

We’ve also been reading a lot of stories of people who fought against injustice and worked to improve life for people (mostly in the US right now, but not all). Malala Yousafzai, Coretta Scott King, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Marian Anderson, Lena Horne, Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Soujourner Truth, Billie Jean King, Jane Addams, Florence Mills, John Lewis, Gordon Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Rube Goldberg, Rosa Parks. There are *so* many interesting and beautifully illustrated biographies out there for kids, and I’m really enjoying using them to show my daughter what courage, dedication, sacrifice, and hard work look like.

I feel so fortunate that the library has at least partially opened again. 🙂

Current Podcast Love

I’m finishing catching up newer episodes of Smart Podcast, Trashy Books. I’ve listened to a few different episodes of a few different writing podcasts, but haven’t fallen in love with any of them yet (I used to love Writing Excuses, but as I usually listen to podcasts as I’m falling asleep, I need something just a little bit calmer! They’re hilarious!). I’ll keep hunting until I find one that appeals to me.

I also discovered Read Me Romance, a podcast hosted by Alexa Riley and Tessa Bailey (Alexa Riley is a team, like Christina Lauren, so this is actually three people!). The hosts chat for the first 10-20 minutes of the podcast, and the rest is an audiobook chapter or two from a romance novella (sometimes written by the hosts, sometimes other people). I’ve been listening both as I’m falling asleep and when I’m exercising, and it’s fun. 🙂

Stephanie’s Read Harder Challenge

Currently on hold.

Real Life Stuff

Oof. What a month. It wasn’t busy, but the weight of all of this *gestures broadly at everything* has really started to bear down on me. The amount of people not taking this virus seriously- how did so many people graduate high school, COLLEGE, EVEN, and lack a third-grade understanding of science and basic, BASIC civics education?!?!?!? HOW??? HOW ARE WE SUPPOSED TO HAVE A FUNCTIONING SOCIETY WITH THESE PEOPLE? I have truly lost every last bit of patience on social media and I’m not afraid to let my ire out these days. NO, COVID-19 isn’t the sniffles. NO, you cannot have your tax dollars back when your child graduates high school and you (so you think) no longer use the services of the public school system. NO, there’s not a magic cure for cancer that scientists don’t want you to know (do you think scientists don’t die of cancer???). I seriously cannot with these people anymore.

*deep breath*

Life goes on around here. I’m missing my family an awful lot these days, which adds to my frustration when people are out there being stupid- they’re being stupid and those of us taking this seriously are stuck staying away from our loved ones even longer. It’s like we’re being held hostage by the dumbest people out there, and it makes me angry and sad. I do my best to keep it together for my kids, though. My son is getting ready to start his classes with the community college- all online, thankfully; we’re referring to it as the University of the Holy Basement (the basement is where his computer is located). My daughter and I do school in the mornings; she has a video chat playdate with a friend’s daughter most afternoons. They play dolls and other various toys, and it’s so cute hearing them chatter to each other. She looks forward to it every day.

I’m writing or, I should say, I’m trying to write. I wrote about 6000 words this month, which is pretty good, putting my current WIP at just over 28,000 words. Some days even trying to come up with a single sentence is difficult and like swimming through a pit of mud; other days, I dash off a thousand words at a pop without think. Slow and steady wins the race, though. I’ll get there. 6000 words is awesome progress, being that I was stuck at 19,000 words for so. freaking. long!

So what happens in August?

My son will start college classes, fully remote. My daughter’s school will begin fully remote- which is excellent, because, as I told the school on the survey they sent out last month, if they didn’t have a fully remote option, we’d be pulling her and fully homeschooling until it was safe (I love and support our public schools, but I’m not risking my daughter’s life. I’m able to keep her home and school her at home, and thus she’d be one less kid in the stream. I absolutely feel like because I can keep her home, it’s my responsibility to society to keep her home). The school is apparently working on ways to get kids back in the building safely, but even then they said they’ll still be offering the option of remote learning, and we’ll take full advantage of that. I’m happy to do it completely myself, but it’ll be much easier to have the guidance of the school and she’ll have fewer gaps in her learning when it IS safe to go back (meaning, she’ll have learned the same things they have and stayed on the same track. Were I to homeschool her on my own, she may learn other things and not exactly what they have. It’d be the same thing as transferring from one school to another, if that makes sense!).

I also turn 40 this month. 😀 What a way to celebrate that milestone, amirite???

Anyway, hang in there, friends. If you’re outside the US, hopefully your country is handling the pandemic well and things are getting back to normal for you. If you’re in the US like me, well, hopefully you’re doing the best you can under such awful circumstances. You’re all in my heart. Be strong, be creative, fight against injustice wherever you see it, wear your mask, wash your hands, and keep socially distancing so we can get through this and I can see my mom and dad again. My kids miss their grandparents. Love to you all. Be safe, and have as lovely of an August as you can make it. ❤

2 thoughts on “Monthly roundup: July 2020

  1. I sometimes think keeping up with the laundry is the only thing I have control of in my life–and it’s keeping me sane. LOL I am glad you were able to get together for a picnic with family. It sounds really nice! My local library just opened up for curbside service this past month, but we haven’t been. Sounds like you had a great reading month overall!

    The lack of seriousness over COVID-19 is really frustrating me as well. I am so tired of people not taking it seriously. Honestly though, it doesn’t surprise me all that much given what I’ve heard and seen these past few years. The school situation has had me in knots. My husband got news he will be able to work from home permanently, which opened up the viritual option for us. While I’m working from home mostly, I still am required to go into the office as well–and can be recalled to work full-time in the office again at any time (although that’s unlikely any time soon). Virtual isn’t ideal for us, but it seemed the best option given the uncertainty of everything. And, as you said, since we do have the option, us choosing virtual makes it a little safer for those who do not have a choice. Of course, right now, everyone in my county will be virtual per state mandate. I really feel for those who this will be a hardship for–but I do think it’s the best of the worst options right now. I hope the school year goes well for both of your kids! And for you. We’re all in this together!

    Have a great week and month of August. Stay safe and well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You nailed it- the best of the worst options. My friend and I were discussing this the other day; every option comes with such a large amount of negatives, which makes all of this so, so difficult. My daughter’s school released a really well thought out plan this week; they’ll be entirely virtual until who-knows-when; they said the earliest they could imagine having kids back in the building would be late September or early October, but who knows what the COVID situation will look like then. I’m prepared for her to be home all year, and that’s fine with me. (I mean, not FINE, it’s not normal or ideal, but it’s the safest for her, the safest for everyone else, and thus, what I’m happiest with.) I’m glad you’re able to manage virtual learning; I so feel for parents who aren’t able to manage as easily or who are scrambling. We’ve exposed so many societal problems during this pandemic, but I fear that these problems will continue to be ignored…

      Be safe and have a wonderful August! 🙂

      Like

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